USBGF Intermediate Divisional LX

Konstantin Keresteliev

Congratulations to Konstantin Keresteliev, winner of the Intermediate Divisional LX. Konstantin defeated Brian Holmes in the 13-point final. Vera Holley and Gary Knox finished 3/4 in the 11-point semi-final.

The Intermediate Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating of 1500.00 and lower at the time of registration. See current online tournament ratings at Online Circuit Leaderboard.

Bray’s Learning Curve: A Bot Play

Money Play. How should Red play 44?

2019 - Intermediates 13

XGID=a-a-BBBCD-A-b-a–cbc-b–A-:1:-1:1:44:0:0:3:0:10

This is a difficult position that I got wrong in my first analysis.

In fact there are two perfectly valid game plans. The pure blitz of 7/3(2), 10/2* is thematic because Red has fourteen checkers in the attack zone. Unless White rolls an immediate 2 or double 1 or double 3 he is going to be in a lot of trouble.

The second approach is the “bot” play of 24/16, 6/2(2)*. This leaves White no discernible target in Red’s home board and escapes Red’s last rear checker, something that the bots put a high premium on.

The rollout has the blitz as the winner by a tiny amount but, in reality, there is no difference between the two plays. The position neatly demonstrates that there can be two perfectly valid game plans in a single position.

30 years ago I would wager that nobody would have considered 24/16, 6/2(2)* but the bots have taught us to look at things differently and thus progress is made.

 

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Intermediates 13 rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

 

Bray’s Learning Curve: Which Point?

 

Money Play. How should Red play 33?

2019 - Beginners 13

XGID=-b—-E-C–AdD—cad—-aB:0:0:1:33:0:0:3:0:10

This is another third roll position that demonstrates an important learning point.

Obviously two of Red’s threes are forced, bar/22(2). The question is should Red then make his 5-pt with 8/5(2), his 3-pt with 6/3(2) or his 10-pt with 13/10(2)?

In the early skirmishes it is usually better to make home board points rather than outer board points as home board points have the advantage of reducing your opponent’s entry numbers if he/she has a blot hit. That is the case here and 13/10(2) comes last of our three plays, although it is extremely close.

So, which home board point should Red make? 6/3(2) leaves White only one hitting number, 64 while 8/5(2) leaves four hitting numbers: 64, 61, 52 and 43. Is it worth giving the extra shots to make the better point? The answer is yes, and it is because of the structure of White’s board with blots on his bar-point and ace-point. If Red is hit, he will have a lot of return shots. So ,in this case ,the risk is worth the reward.

If you take a checker from White’s 6-pt and put it on his ace-point thus giving him his ace-point then the two plays become equal.

There are two key learning points here:

  • If your opponent has home board weaknesses you can take more risk on your own side of the board to improve your position.
  • Always take the time to look at the whole board. Only then should you look at candidate plays and choose between them

 

 

Rollout Data from Extreme Gammon

Beginners 13 Rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF February Monthly Circuit

Miki Laukkanen 2018

Congratulations to Miki Laukkanen, winner of the USBGF 2019 February Monthly Circuit. Miki won this single elimination tournament by defeating Steven Waller in the 17-point final match.

Bob Stringer and Marcus Selle finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final match. See the latest Online Circuit Leader Board posting here.

USBGF Intermediate Divisional LIX

Yusuf Adenwala 2018

Congratulations to Yusuf Adenwala, winner of the Intermediate Divisional LIX. Yusuf defeated Jesse Anderson-Lehman in the 13-point final. Gillian Misrahi and Konstantin Kresteliev finished 3/4 in the 11-point semi-final.

The Intermediate Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating of 1500.00 and lower at the time of registration. See current online tournament ratings at Online Circuit Leaderboard.

Brays Learning Curve: Asset or Hit?

  1. a) Money Play. How should Red play 31?

    b) Money Play. How should Red play 42?

Basic Begiiners 3

XGID=-a—-EaC—dE-a-c-e—-B-:0:0:1:31:0:0:3:0:10

When replying to the opening roll we are taught to hit a blot to take a tempo from our opponent and gain ground in the race, but we are also taught to make new points on the board. What happens when you have to choose between the two?

Here White has opened with 63 and played the standard 24/18, 13/10. How should Red play both 31 and 42? Before computers nobody was absolutely sure of the answer, but time has moved on and we now know that with 31 Red should make his 5-pt but with his 42 he should hit with 13/7*. Why is there is a difference between the two plays?

Firstly 31 makes the best point on the board, your own 5-pt or the “Golden Point’ as Paul Magriel named it. 42 could be played 8/4, 6/4 making the ‘Silver Point’ but the 4-pt is not as strong as the 5-pt simply because of the gap left on the 5-pt.

Secondly if Red hits with 31 by playing 24/21, 8/7* or 13/10, 8/7* he has to use the last spare checker on his 8-pt to do so and that reduces his flexibility for future moves. Conversely when Red hits with 13/7* with a roll of 42 he is unstacking the heavy mid-point and he maintains the spare checker on the 8-pt.

These differences might seem small but over time these things add up and if you always play these two moves correctly then you will see the benefits over the long-term.

So, remember. With 31 take the 5-pt asset but with 42 the hit is correct. This concept extends well beyond the opening. Often it is right to take the 5-pt asset when you can but it is correct to hit if an inferior point is on offer as the alternative.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Basic Beginners Rollout 3

Basic Beginners Rollout 3a

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

Brays Learning Curve: Which Back Game

Money Game. How should Red play 21?

 2019 - Experts 12

This position was featured in a Facebook discussion on back games. My initial reaction was to play bar/22 so that Red could release that spare checker on the 22-pt with a six, thus maintaining the timing he needs to play his 1-3 back game. Without this being set as a quiz question, I would not have given it much more thought.

Some of the heavyweights of the backgammon world joined the discussion and most of them were in favour of bar/23, 24/23, electing to play a 2-3 back game. That surprised me and so it was time to ask XG its opinion. Lo and behold, as you can see from then rollout below, bar/23, 24/23 is the clear winner.

Now we need to understand why. The 2-3 is a better back game than the 1-3 game because all of White’s numbers have to be played and he cannot slow himself down (that is the main problem with the 1-2 back game which requires huge timing). The outcome is that the 2-3 game generates shots earlier than the 1-3 game. Remember that the general rule of thumb for back games is that you must trail in the race by the number of pips represented by your two back game points. So, to play a 2-3 game you need to trail by 90 pips.

Red is close to that here so that points towards being able to play a 2-3 game. Red has timing because of his two checkers on his mid-points and his spares on his 6-pt. That gives him about 26 pips of timing while White has less than that and must soon begin to break his prime. Additionally with any two Red will be able to play 24-22 and then a six will release that checker.

The bottom line is that the move I have played in such situations for years, bar/22, is actually a bad error and so I have really learnt something from studying this position. You have to take away quite a lot of pips from Red’s timing before bar/22 becomes the correct play in such situations. In fact the two checkers on his mid-point have to be in his home board before bar/22 becomes the best play.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

 

Experts 12 Rollout

 

 

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

 

Bray’s Learning Curve: Man or Mouse?

Match Play. Red leads 9-6 to 13. How should Red play 32?

2019 - Intermediates 12

XGID=–C-aCD-B-BA——accbbba-:0:0:1:32:9:6:0:13:10

After this play of his 32 Red will be 7 pips behind in the race but White still has to escape his rear checker.

Red can play aggressively with (a) 11/8, 6/4*. He can play totally safe with (b) 11/6 or he can build his home board with (c) 6/3, 5/3 and leave White four hitting numbers (43, 34, 52, 25). Which is the correct move?

Over the board Red had visions of losing a gammon if White hit a blot and then seeing his lead being cut to 9-8. He chose the very passive (c), White escaped and won the game with a  cube a few rolls later. As you can see from the rollout this is a triple blunder.

Better is (b), building the board at the cost of four shots. This play is a merely an error.

The point about this position is that Red cannot play passively. He must attack the White blot to prevent it from escaping. The correct move is (a). At the cost of 13 shots Red builds a potentially winning position. If White fans he can cash the game. Otherwise he will have caught up another 4 pips in the race and White’s blot will still be subject to further attack.

Whatever move Red selects White will still be the favourite to win the game but Red must optimise his own winning chances. The best way to do that is to hit the White checker. Note that 6/4*/1 is not the right idea. It minimises immediate shots but the second blot on the 11-pt costs Red more gammons when he does lose.

In the main, timidity is the wrong mindset for backgammon. A positive attitude over the board usually pays dividends and that is the case in this position. Remember twenty-three of White’s numbers do not hit the blot on Red’s 4-pt after 11/8, 6/4* and just look at the swing on a number such as double fives by White!

So, please think positively.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

 Intermediates 12 rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

 

 

USBGF Intermediate Divisional LVII

Ivan Carrizo 2019

Congratulations to Ivan Carrizo, winner of the Intermediate Divisional LVII. Ivan defeated Yusuf Adenwala in the 13-point final. Ira Gardner and Curt Wilhelmsen finished 3/4 in the 11-point semi-final.

The Intermediate Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating of 1500.00 and lower at the time of registration. See current online tournament ratings at Online Circuit Leaderboard.

Brays Learning Curve: Reference Positions

 

Money Play. Should Red double? If doubled, should Red take?

2019 - Beginners 12

XGID=—CCbD-B—eC—babc—–:0:0:1:00:0:0:3:0:10

 When we start to teach the use of the doubling cube, we begin with endgame problems because they are easy to calculate exactly. However, the vast majority of doubling decisions cannot be calculated precisely and so we have to rely on reference positions.

These are positions that we have committed to memory where we ‘know’ the correct cube action. When a similar position arises, we make use of the reference position by accessing it and then adjusting our decision based opon the actual position we have to consider.

One of the reasons beginners play so slowly is that they have very few reference positions upon which to draw, and they end up trying to solve problems from first principles which does take a lot of time. The more you play the greater your reference library becomes and the easier it is to find a useful position to use as a reference.

This week’s position is a classic reference position for playing against the five-point holding game.

Red is clearly the favourite and should double now because rolling nearly any double will lose his market. He leads the race by 55 pips so unless White rolls a lot of big doubles he is very unlikely to win the race.

White’s route to victory is to build his home board points (in order), hit a Red checker, contain it and win with a redouble. In this position White has plenty of time to keep his mid-point and Red may soon have to leave a shot as he tries to clear-his own mid-point.

If the race were closer White may have to give up his mid-point and rely on hitting a shot from Red’s 5-pt. The beauty of this type of position is that as White’s racing chances diminish his hitting chances increase.

The rule of thumb is that Red should be 20 pips ahead in the race before he doubles and White can take until he is nearly 60 pips behind. That’s quite a range! Once White is more than 60 pips behind he has to pass because he loses too many gammons, a point you may not have considered.

If you want to study these type of positions in more depth try to get hold of a copy Kit Woolsey’s “The Backgammon Encyclopedia: Volume 1”.

 

Rollout Data from Extreme Gammon

Beginners 12 Rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF Advanced Divisional XLVI

hbdrake2_sm-178x248

Congratulations to H. B. Drake, winner of the Advanced Divisional XLVI. H. B. defeated William Porter in the 17-point final. Marcus Selle and Peter Chechele finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final.

The Advanced Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating between 1500.01 – 1649.99 at the time of registration. See current online standings: Leader Board.

USBGF Advanced Divisional LXVII

Bonnie_Rogoff 2019 Ohio

Congratulations to Bonnie Rogoff, winner of the Advanced Divisional LXVII. Bonnie defeated Anna White Owl Khan in the 17-point final. Michele Barone and Martin Stembecker finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final.

The Advanced Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating between 1500.01 – 1649.99 at the time of registration. See current online standings: Leader Board.

Bray’s Learning Curve: Opening Roll Responses

Money Play. How should Red play 21?

Basic Begiiners 2

XGID=-a–a-E-C—dEa–c-e—-B-:0:0:1:21:0:0:3:0:10

With the opening roll we look to do three things: make new points; unstack the mid-point and 6-pt; advance the rear checkers.

When responding to the opening roll we will have a fourth option, namely hitting an opponent’s blot. Unlike at the end of the game when a hit can be fatal because of your opponent’s strong home board, a hit in the opening is usually anything but fatal.

However, it does something very important and that is to take a tempo away from your opponent. He will have to spend half of his next roll entering from the bar (and sometimes he rolls 66 and stays on the bar, that is known as a boxcar bonus). Therefore, unless he rolls a double, he is unlikely to make a new point. Thus, he spends his time reacting to your play rather than having the freedom to play his whole roll as he chooses. The more you play backgammon the more you realise how important it is to take tempi from your opponent

Having understood the thinking, you should now to be able to play Red’s 21 in response to White’s opening 32 (played, 24/21, 13/11). Red must hit 6/4* with the 2 to take a tempo. After that the logical 1 is 24/23, getting one of the back checkers moving on its way while White is preoccupied on the bar. All non-hitting plays are too passive as you can see from the rollout.

What about if White had rolled 52, played 24/22, 13/8. How would you play 64?

Before the advent of computers most people played 24/14 but the bots have taught us that 13/3*, taking that all-important tempo, is correct.

There are many other opening rolls and possible responses (actually about 600 of them) but as you play more and more those responses will become second nature to you. The more you play the quicker you will learn them!

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Basic Beginners Rollout 2

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF Intermediate Divisional LVIII

Christa Solovey Int 2019

Congratulations to Christa Solovey, winner of the Intermediate Divisional LVIII. Christa defeated Elizabeth Liberty in the 13-point final. Kara Schultz and Vera Holley finished 3/4 in the 11-point semi-final. The Intermediate Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating of 1500.00 and lower at the time of registration. See current online tournament ratings at Online Circuit Leaderboard.

Bray’s Learning Curve: Not Good Enough Too Good to Double

  1. Money Play. Should Red double? If doubled, should White take?

  2. Match Play. Red leads 4-0 to 7. Should Red double? If doubled, should White take?

2019 - Experts 11

XGID=-aC—-b-a—a—abcbb—A:0:0:1:00:0:0:3:0:10

I was watching a match between two strong players on GridGammon when this position came up. Red doubled and White snapped up the cube which I must say surprised me. Red easily won a gammon and the match. I was sure that White should have passed but then started doing some detailed analysis.

Let’s quickly deal with the money game question. Red should double (activating gammons) and White should pass very quickly indeed. Taking this double would be worse than a quintuple blunder – see the rollout below. If you even considered taking this cube in a money game, then some swift re-evaluation of your cube handling is required!

The match score question is very different. This is fundamentally a prime-versus-prime position and it is well-known that these positions generate a high percentage of gammons for both sides. That is exactly what White wants, especially if the cube gets to 4 when a gammon will win the match for him. Holding a 2-cube and already down 4-0 White will need very little excuse to redouble to 4. For example, any game-winning single shot will suffice.

What is truly surprising is that technically Red should not double – see the rollout below. This position falls into the category of “not good enough, too good to double”. This means that Red should leave the cube alone and play on for an undoubled gammon which would get him to 6-0 (Crawford). Of course, he can always use the cube later if the position warrants it. Naturally White should accept the cube if doubled (as he did in the actual game).

Having said all that for practical purposes Red should double. A high percentage of players will drop this and play from 0-5 behind. XG gives you a percentage figure on rollouts that would change its decision. In the rollout below you will see the figure is 3.2%. Many more than 3 out of 100 players will drop this double so unless I was certain my opponent was taking the double, I would ship the cube here.

When watching the match, I had let my money play thinking cloud my match play judgement, one of the most common errors in backgammon.   If you got this problem right for the right reasons, then very well done.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Money

Experts 11 Rollout - Money

Match

Experts 11 Rollout - Match

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF January Monthly Circuit

Ted Chee LA2018_pg

Congratulations to Ted Chee, winner of the USBGF 2019 January Monthly Circuit. Ted won this single elimination tournament by defeating Kevin Jones in the 17-point final match. Ted Chee and William Lonergan and Garrett Duquesne finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final match.

See the Online Circuit Leader Board posting here.

Bray’s Learning Curve: Weighing Anchors

Match Play. Red leads 4-2 to 11. How should Red play 55?

2019 - Intermediates 11

XGID=-aaB-bE-B—bCb–b-dBa—A:0:0:1:55:4:2:0:11:10

This position comes from the recent Boston Open. The score is actually irrelevant to the play.

Red played bar/15, 20/15(2) with his double fives but that was not the best play.

Giving up an anchor in a backgammon game is a major decision and the more I play the more I like to hang on to my anchor. Of course, eventually you have to give up your anchor and run for home but if you can do it with a gain of tempo (i.e. hitting your opponent as you do so) so much the better.

When there is a lot of play left in a position, as is the case here, then normally you are better off holding on to the anchor so that you have a safe re-entry point. There is likely to be quite a lot of hitting before this game is finished and so Red should have kept hold of his opponent’s 5-pt.

He should have played bar/20, 6/1(2)* (Barclay Cooke would turn in his grave with making the ace-point so early!) and then thought about the third five. He could play safe with 13/8 but he has gained a tempo by putting White on the bar. Three checkers on the 15-pt is inefficient and so the spare checker should be put to work with 20/15. 13/8 is too safe a play given the demands of the position and as you can see from the rollout such a passive play is actually a blunder.

The result is that after bar/15, 6/1(2)* Red has maintained a flexible game plan. After bar/15, 20/15(2) he has no choice but to try to tip-toe through the minefield to bring his checkers home safely – a blot being hit could be ruinous. Try playing the position out a few times and you will find just how difficult it is to bring those checkers home.

There isn’t a huge equity difference between the two top plays but the important thing is to understand the concepts behind bar/15, 6/1(2)*.

So, remember – keep hold of your anchors!

 

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Intermediates 11 rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF Intermediate Divisional LV

Jeff Spencer 2019

Congratulations to Jeffrey Spencer, winner of the Intermediate Divisional LV. Jeff defeated Marcela Pelagatti in the 13-point final. Christa Solovey and Marcus Selle finished 3/4 in the 11-point semi-final.

The Intermediate Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating of 1500.00 and lower at the time of registration to enter the tournament. See current online tournament ratings at Online Circuit Leaderboard.

USBGF Intermediate Divisional LVI

Marcus Selle 2019

Congratulations to Marcus Selle, winner of the Intermediate Divisional LVI. Marcus defeated Simona Staneva in the 13-point final. Sharooz Moreh and Kamron Kheirani finished 3/4 in the 11-point semi-final. The Intermediate Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating of 1500.00 and lower at the time of registration to enter the tournament. See current online tournament ratings at Online Circuit Leaderboard.

Bray’s Learning Curve: The Third Roll

 

Money Play. How should Red play 32?

2018 - Beginners 11

XGID=-b—-EBB—eD—b-db—B-:0:0:1:32:0:0:3:0:10

After the second roll there are about 600 possible positions. When it gets to third roll there are many thousands so you cannot learn them off by heart, instead you have to learn the appropriate principles.

This position arises after Red has opened with 61 (13/7, 8/7) and White has replied with 31 (8/5, 6/5). Red must now play 32. How should he play it?

Once your opponent has made his 5-pt it is normally correct to split the back checkers to stop your opponent quickly building a prime in front of your rear checkers.

That would imply playing 24/22, 13/10 or 24/21, 13/11. Surprisingly enough both these moves are still errors because they don’t go far enough in applying the correct principle. The correct move is 24/22, 24/21, advancing both rear checkers. One of the ideas behind the play is that if one of the checkers is pointed on, you might be able to make an advanced anchor using the other one.

It is interesting to see how big a blunder 13/11, 13/10 is. That play strips the mid-point of its spare builders and does nothing about addressing the strength of White’s home board position. 13/8 is also very weak because it does virtually nothing to improve Red’s position at a time when he should be taking risks.

The key here is to learn the principle of advancing both checkers and then put that principle into use in your own future games.

Rollout Data from Extreme Gammon

beginners 11 Roolout

 

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit

Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

 

 

 

USBGF Advanced Divisional LXV

2018 Parks David

Congratulations to David Parks, winner of the Advanced Divisional LXV. David defeated Kevin Jones in the 17-point final. Max Glaezer and Tom Horton finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final.

The Advanced Divisional requires players have a Circuit Elo rating between 1500.01 – 1649.99 at the time of registration. See current online standings: Leader Board.

Brays Learning Curve: The Opening Roll

 

Money Play. How should Red play 64?

Basic Begiiners 1

XGID=-b—-E-C—eE—c-e—-B-:0:0:1:64:0:0:3:0:10

What could be easier than the opening roll? After all, there are only fifteen of them that you have to learn. Not too much work for anybody.

Five opening rolls are always played the same way: 31 (8/5, 6/5); 42 (8/4, 6/4); 53 (8/3, 6/3): 61 (13/7, 8/7) and 65 (24/13). These moves have stood the test of time although as late as the mid-1970s 53 was often played 13/10, 13/8! The game is old (5,000 years) but some of the theory is quite young.

With the other ten opening rolls you have choices as to how you play them. I have chosen to discuss 64. For years this was played 24/14, simply running a back checker in an attempt to get it to safety. Then people started moving 6x by moving 24/18, 13/x. This applied to 62, 63 and 64. The idea behind this play is to either make the opponent’s bar-point next turn or promote an exchange of hits on that bar-point. Normally that exchange of hits is favourable to the player who opens with the 6x.

For years, players laughed at the third choice, 8/2, 6/2, making the 2-pt. It was felt that this play made a point too deep in the home board so near the start of the game. Then along came computers and lo and behold, they think that making the 2-pt is a very reasonable move.

As you can see from the rollout below there is virtually nothing to choose between the three plays and so it becomes a matter of personal choice (except in match play but that is a lesson for another day). The three moves lead to very different types of game so if you want a simple game choose 24/14. Pick 24/18, 13/9 for complexity and 8/2, 6/2 lies somewhere between the other two.

The opening roll is likely to be the last time you have a choice so enjoy it while you can.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Basic Beginners Rollout 1

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF November Online Circuit

2018 Tampa_Michael Neagu

Congratulations to Michael Neagu, winner of the USBGF 2018 November Monthly Circuit. Michael won this single elimination tournament by defeating Miki Laukkanen in the 17-point final match. Andrew Selby and John Manning finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final match. See the Online Circuit Leader Board posting here.

Brays Learning Curve: Complex Ending

  1. Money Play. Should Red double? If doubled, should White take?

  2. Match Play. Red leads 2-1 to 5. Should Red double? If doubled, should White take?

2018 - Experts 10

XGID=-aC—-b-a—a—abcbb—A:0:0:1:00:0:0:3:0:10

Without an extensive knowledge of reference positions this is a difficult problem. If you have seen something like this before it makes life a lot easier!

I know that if those three checkers on the 2-pt were safely on the ace-point this would be a double and a huge pass but the possibility of White picking up a second (and even a third) checker make things much more complex. Of course, White has to know the right technique to maximise his chances of picking up that additional checker. He must build a prime, then Red has to roll an inconvenient ace and play 2/1* and then White must hit that exposed checker.

White must be patient and the game may well go on for a long time. However, the threat of picking up that additional checker makes this a very easy take for White and in fact, Red only just has a double.  Unless, of course, he thinks that White will drop and believe me a fair few people will drop this.

At the match score, doubling this position would be a gargantuan blunder. White will need little excuse to to redouble to four and put the match on the line as his winning chances from 1-4 down (Crawford) are only 17%. Red must leave the cube where it is at this match score and hope to win a gammon to take him to 4-1 ahead. He will actually win a gammon about 17% of the time from the start position.

Because of the match score Red may not even be able to double if he ends up with a single checker closed out. It will depend upon if he has any other checkers exposed in his home board and White’s exact bear-off structure.

You can learn a lot from this position by adjusting it slightly. For example, change the match score to 1-1, and see what impact that has. As I have remarked before backgammon is a very complex game and you can learn a lot by an in-depth study of any single position. This one is worthy of your attention! 

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Money

Experts 10 Rollout - Money

Match

Experts 10 Rollout - Match

 

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

 

Brays Learning Curve: Gammons Count Double

Money Play. How should Red play 31?

2018 - Intermediates 10

 

XGID=-BBCBBBb—–B—–ababdc-:1:-1:1:31:0:0:3:0:10

Over the board Red played 5/4, 5/2 but that was a mistake.

Red must take advantage of the weakness in White’s home board while it exists. He should note that the race is close, although White has some home board wastage. By next turn White may have tidied up his home board and Red may have to break from his midpoint as he has no safe sixes to play elsewhere. He should not be breaking up his perfect home board, rather he should be using it as a weapon.

The correct play is 13/12, 13/10. Now Red has not wasted any pips in the race and if White hits he risks losing a gammon to any return hit. In fact, most of the plays that break the home board win the same or slightly more single games than 13/12, 13/10 but that play wins 10% more gammons – a huge difference.

Players tend to look at the downsides of any potentially risky play and lose sight of the upsides. Remember that gammons do count double!

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

 

Intermediates 10 rollout

 

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

 

 

USBGF October Monthly Circuit

Ted Chee LA2018_pg

Congratulations to Ted Chee, winner of the USBGF 2018 October Monthly Circuit. Ted won this single elimination tournament by defeating Manny Olszynko in the 17-point final match. Jerry Unger and Kat Denison finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final match. See the Online Circuit Leader Board posting here.

Brays Learning Curve: Count the Ways

 

Money Play. Should Red double? If doubled, should White take?

2018 - Beginners 10

XGID=–DF-aCB———–bdbbbb-:0:0:1:00:0:0:3:0:10

This type of position is fairly common so it is best to know how to deal with it.

First, it should be clear that Red should double. With a 15-pip lead in the race and multiple market-losing sequences not doubling here would be a double blunder.

The interesting question is whether or not can White can take. His thinking should go along these lines:

Red will leave me a shot with 62, 26, 44, 55 and 66. I will hit that 30% of the time so that is 1.5 wins out of 36.

What about the race? Red is nominally 15 pips ahead but that is not a true count. He has six checkers on his 3-pt and four checkers on his 2-pt. that will add approximately 6 pips to his adjusted pip count. In addition, he will have empty 4- and 5-pts in the bear-off so that will create further inefficiencies for him. On the down side he has only two crossovers and two pips to get his checkers home while I have 4 crossovers and 15 pips to roll before I can begin to bear-off.

In the 31 games where he doesn’t leave me a shot, can I win 7.5 of them to bring me up to the nine games I need to win to accept the double? To answer that question requires both experience and judgment but it can be made a lot easier if you have a reference document. Luckily, you will find “Backgammon Races” in the download section of my website: www.chrisbraybackgammon.com

The answer in this particular case is that White can take with relative comfort. The key to learning is then to adjust the position to find out what happens when things change. Move the spare on White’s 4-pt to his 5-pt and he can still take the double but move it to his 6-pt and the position becomes a drop.

In the initial position if we move one of the spare checkers on Red’s 3-pt to his 6-pt the position becomes double/drop because 44,55 and 66 now play safely. So small differences in the position can make a big difference to the cube action – tricky game backgammon.

 

Rollout Data from Extreme Gammon

Beginners 10 Rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

USBGF December Monthly Circuit

2017_AlfredMamlet_Silicon V

Congratulations to Alfred Mamlet, winner of the USBGF 2018 December Monthly Circuit. Alfred won this single elimination tournament by defeating Rich Sweetman in the 17-point final match. Ray Bills and John Graas finished 3/4 in the 15-point semi-final match. See the Online Circuit Leader Board posting here.

Brays Learning Curve: Match Play Problem

Match Play. Score 4-4 to 7. Should Red redouble? If redoubled, should White take?

 

2018 - Experts 9

XGID=—B-aDBBB—B–aAbbbc-bb-:0:0:1:63:4:6:1:7:10

Once again, the match score dominates the doubling decision.

For money this would be a very premature redouble as White has all his checkers in play and,  owning the cube, he would be in a powerful position to redouble Red if the game turned around.

However, at this match score the cube is valueless to White and so it is merely a question of whether Red is a sufficient enough favourite to redouble now.

White’s point of last take is 25% (the match-winning chances he would have if he dropped the redouble). Is Red close enough to 75% winning chances to redouble? As ever that is a matter of using experience to make the judgement and an exact percentage estimate is impossible.

However, Red has a five-point prime, a five-point home board and White is on the bar. He is certainly a strong favourite. Over the board I redoubled this position and my opponent dropped.

White should have taken as you can see from the rollout below. Red is near the top of his doubling window but not above it. Therefore, the answer is that Red should redouble and White should take.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Experts 9 Rollout

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray

 

Brays Learning Curve: Good Numbers and Bad Numbers

Money Play. How should Red play 43?

2018 - Intermediates 9

XGID=-BbC-BB-D——–bbcd–bB-:0:0:1:43:0:0:3:0:10

This is not a very difficult problem but Red went astray over the board by playing 24/21, 8/4, which is an unnecessary overplay. White replied with 64, played 7/1*, 5/1 and after Red fanned, White won with cube.

Red should observe that White has 13 checkers in the attack zone and that should flag up an immediate warning. Those extra checkers on the 6- and 5-pts are just itching to join the battle. At the moment White’s sixes and some of his fours play badly but not after 24/21, 8/4.

Equally well Red cannot afford the luxury of the ‘safe’ play which puts a third useless checker on his ace-point and does nothing to help his position.

The correct play is 8/5, 8/4 which puts the checkers where Red wants and just as importantly does not allow White an attack. There is also some duplication of twos.

White is a strong favourite irrespective of which play Red chooses but anything other than 8/5, 8/4 is a bad blunder.

They key is that Red must stop all those checkers in White’s home board coming into play.

Rollout Information from Extreme Gammon

Intermediates 9 rollout

 

Bray’s Learning Curve — A Great Member Benefit
Bray’s Learning Curve is a USBGF online series by author Chris Bray. Each week Chris lends his sharp insight and easy to understand analysis to help you improve your game. Visit the USBGF Facebook page every Monday to view an interesting backgammon position and join in the lively discussion, return on Tuesday to view the answer. In addition, as a USBGF member, you get access to this companion blog article that includes an expanded explanation.  More about Chris Bray